Tectile's kitchen corner.

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tectile
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Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by tectile » Tue May 28, 2019 10:26 pm

Over the last 20 years or so, I've really enjoyed exploring the art and science of cooking.
My wife is a good cook but lacks the patients and creativity that I have (She's happy to admit that) so 90% of the cooking chores have fallen to me.
My body can only tolerate fast food burgers and pizza for so long and then it says "What the F are you doing? I need real food"!
I'm going to make Salisbury steak, real mashed potatoes and grilled asparagus tonight. Yum!
This meal will take about an hour to put together and cost half the price it would at a reasonably good restaurant.
Plus, I don't have to put up with other people talking loudly around me, background music no one wants to hear or bad service. Yup, I'm turning into a cranky old man :)
If you have a favorite recipe, cooking technique or a cool kitchen gadget you want to share post them here.
I do love me a cool kitchen gadget :) Just bought an air fryer a couple of months ago. Love it!

I'll start with my method for making movie theater popcorn at home.
This recipe requires a bit of financial investment at first but it pays for itself in the long run.
I don't think it's a good idea to post a bunch of external links here so you will just have to use your gargle search wagon.

1. Get yourself a Whirleypop.

Wabash Valley Farms 22000MG Original Whirley Pop Stove Top Popcorn Popper Silver - Perfect Popcorn in 3 Minutes, Regular

You really do get perfectly popped corn every time if you follow the instructions.

2. It's all about the oil.
Canola oil and peanut oil are all fine and dandy but if you want to take it to the next level, you need to use butter flavored coconut oil to get that movie theater taste.

Franklin’s Gourmet Popcorn Butter Flavored Coconut Oil - 30 oz. Tub.

I'm sure there are many fine butter flavored coconut oils out there but I'm still working my way through the Franklin's tub I bought 2 years ago. Coconut oil keeps forever if you store it properly.

3. Don't use ordinary table salt.

Morton makes a nice finely ground salt just for popcorn but you can go one better.

I use Flavacol

Gold Medal Prod. 2045 Flavacol Seasoning Popcorn Salt 35oz

A little bit of Flavacol goes a long long way so use it very sparingly.
a 35 oz carton will likely last you a lifetime.

4. What kind of popping corn should I use, yellow or white?
They are both good. Yellow corn makes larger softer corn more like you get at the theater and white makes smaller crunchier corn. Just get a bag of each at your local grocery store and decide for yourself. At the moment, I'm using Jollytime white popping corn.

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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by Kishin » Wed May 29, 2019 4:22 am

We used Coconut Oil and the artificial butter salt at the movie theater I used to work at.
Tastes soooo good!
:faceoff:
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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by Robotman » Wed May 29, 2019 9:36 am

I've learned to really, really love vegetables. When I was a kid, I really hated them, but that was because they were cooked all wrong. They were overcooked into a grey flavourless mash and then heavily salted. All the taste and nutrients had been boiled out. The trick is to not overcook, and in fact to steam them.

You can actually steam vegetables in the microwave, if you cover a plate with a dome. Then give your meal more time to cook at a lower setting. This is my preferred way to cook chopped celery, onions, peppers, and even from-frozen vegetables like broccoli.

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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by Saya » Fri Jun 14, 2019 11:32 pm

I have, through watching multiple YouTube channels and cribbing ruthlessly from their recipes, come up with a lovely stove top pan fried chicken recipe that does a great job of adding a bit of pizzazz to chicken breasts. It's super easy and super delicious, and pairs well with greens, rice or pasta.

1. Boneless, skinless chicken breast, trimmed and cut in half evenly down the middle.
2. 1 Cup white flour. I prefer using unsaturated baking flour, but haven't really tested it with any non-white flour, so not sure how that'd go.
3. 1 tablespoon Italian herbs
4. 1/2 tablespoon onion powder
5. 1 to 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil. You can substitute this for vegetable oil if you prefer.
6. Salt and Pepper for taste at cook's preference.

Step 1. Coat the chicken breast halves in flour. You can either dredge it, or do the "Shake & Bake" method by placing it in a bag and shaking it for about a minute.

Step 2. Pre-heat a medium-sized frying pan on medium heat with your oil until the oil gets nice and hot.

Step 3. Place your chicken breast halves into the pan and cook for 6 to 8 minutes, then turn them over and cook an additional 6 to 8 minutes. You'll know this is going well if the chicken starts to get a nice, golden brown.

Step 4. Pair with your preferred sides and serve!

An easy, super simple way to make a flavorful meal for yourself and/or a friend, partner or family member!
"If the time should ever come when what is now called science, thus familiarized to men, shall be ready to put on, as it were, a form of flesh and blood, the Poet will lend his divine spirit to aid the transfiguration, and will welcome the Being thus produced, as a dear and genuine inmate of the household of man."
- William Wordsworth

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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by tectile » Sun Jun 16, 2019 12:27 pm

Saya wrote:I have, through watching multiple YouTube channels and cribbing ruthlessly from their recipes, come up with a lovely stove top pan fried chicken recipe that does a great job of adding a bit of pizzazz to chicken breasts. It's super easy and super delicious, and pairs well with greens, rice or pasta.

1. Boneless, skinless chicken breast, trimmed and cut in half evenly down the middle.
2. 1 Cup white flour. I prefer using unsaturated baking flour, but haven't really tested it with any non-white flour, so not sure how that'd go.
3. 1 tablespoon Italian herbs
4. 1/2 tablespoon onion powder
5. 1 to 1/2 tablespoon of olive oil. You can substitute this for vegetable oil if you prefer.
6. Salt and Pepper for taste at cook's preference.

Step 1. Coat the chicken breast halves in flour. You can either dredge it, or do the "Shake & Bake" method by placing it in a bag and shaking it for about a minute.

Step 2. Pre-heat a medium-sized frying pan on medium heat with your oil until the oil gets nice and hot.

Step 3. Place your chicken breast halves into the pan and cook for 6 to 8 minutes, then turn them over and cook an additional 6 to 8 minutes. You'll know this is going well if the chicken starts to get a nice, golden brown.

Step 4. Pair with your preferred sides and serve!

An easy, super simple way to make a flavorful meal for yourself and/or a friend, partner or family member!
Ain"t nothin' wrong with that.
May I suggest prepping your breast halves a day ahead of time by soaking them in a bath of buttermilk or whole milk over night in the frig. It's more trouble but pays off in tenderness and texture. I'll use a paring knife or a fork to cut or poke a few holes in the middle of the meat to let the milk get deep inside.

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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by tectile » Sun Jun 16, 2019 1:25 pm

Super easy pork chops.

You will need a 12" or 10" skillet with a lid depending on how many chops you want to make.
I use bone in center cut pork chops about 1/2" thick.
One medium white onion cut into 1/4" slices and separated into rings.
One can of cream of mushroom soup.

Throw the chops in the skillet and sprinkle with black pepper to taste.
Spread onion evenly over the chops.
Spoon the mushroom soup over the meat. The soup will be really thick so just glop it on there. No need to be super even, this recipe is very forgiving. The onion and soup will cook down to a nice gravy on it's own.
Put the lid on the skillet, cook over low to medium low heat for an hour. No need to turn them or fuss with them. Go walk your dog or make sweet love to your lady or do the sensible thing and make your side dishes. Steamed broccoli and instant potatoes are sure to please.

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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by Saya » Tue Jun 18, 2019 12:10 pm

Ooooh. I'm going to have to try both of these at some point in the near future @ . @
"If the time should ever come when what is now called science, thus familiarized to men, shall be ready to put on, as it were, a form of flesh and blood, the Poet will lend his divine spirit to aid the transfiguration, and will welcome the Being thus produced, as a dear and genuine inmate of the household of man."
- William Wordsworth

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Re: Tectile's kitchen corner.

Post by tectile » Fri Jun 21, 2019 2:59 pm

Tiz the season for corn on the cob :)
Local farmers are delivering there crops of sweet corn to farmers markets and grocery stores in my area at rock bottom prices. I bought 4 large ears for a buck yesterday and ate them all.
We only get really good local corn for a couple of months a year and it's on baby.
You can make corn on the cob in the microwave but that method doesn't work well for me.
Throw your shucked ears in a big old pot of boiling water with a 1/4 cup of sugar. Cover and turn off the heat.
Let stand for 10 minutes.
My grandma would use the heals from a loaf of bread as handy butter and salt sponges.
Just roll your ear on the heal as you do your best impression of a beaver gnawing those delicious kernels off the cob.

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